Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti is set to deliver his 2017 State of the City address today at City Hall at 10am.

Watch it live at https://facebook.com/Garcetti

The location of the City Hall chambers for the annual speech is a departure for Garcetti, who last year delivered it at an LED maker near the Port of Los Angeles, at the Valley Performance Arts Center at Cal State Northridge in 2015, and at the Wallis Annenberg Building at the California Science Center in 2014.

George Kivorik, Garcetti’s press secretary, declined to give any preview of what the mayor might discuss. A top focus of last year’s speech was the city’s improving employment numbers.

One topic likely to receive attention is President Donald Trump’s actions and rhetoric on immigration.

The president has threatened to cut federal funding to so-called sanctuary cities, and although the mayor has resisted calling for the city to embrace the term, L.A. could be a target for a loss of funds due to the police department’s limited cooperation with federal authorities on immigration.

Two local issues that could be a focus are housing and transportation, as city voters in November approved a measure that aims to raise $1.2 billion to construct housing for the homeless and country voters approved a measure that is projected to raise $120 billion over 40 years for transportation projects.

Garcetti, who was re-elected for a second term in a landslide in March, is set to deliver the speech at 10 a.m., and at 11 a.m. his proposed budget for 2017-18 will be released.

Over the objections of the oil industry, Council President Herb Wesson wants to eliminate oil drilling in neighborhoods where people live.

City Council President Herb Wesson plans to introduce a motion Wednesday to eliminate oil drilling in Los Angeles near homes, schools and other facilities.

The motion calls for a study on the proposed restrictions, which would also include parks, churches and health-care facilities.

Wesson’s motion does not state how far a drilling operation might need to be located from protected facilities, but it calls for the Department of City Planning, with the assistance of the city attorney and the city’s petroleum administrator, to report back within 90 days with an analysis of possible changes to the city’s zoning code that drilling operations be located within “a certain setback proximity” of residential facilities.

Residents who live near drilling sites have been speaking out in recent years and complaining of health complications they believe are connected to the local oil fields. Continue reading

The Executive Order maintains that wasteful water practice prohibition should still remain in place.

Citing the success of unprecedented conservation efforts and a wealth of recent precipitation statewide, Gov. Jerry Brown ended the drought state of emergency in most of California on Friday. Emergency restrictions will remain in place in Fresno, Kings, Tulare and Tuolumne counties to help address diminished groundwater supplies in those areas.

The executive order issued by Brown effectively terminates the state of emergency implemented in January of 2014. However, it also keeps a focus on conservation efforts. The order states that water reporting requirements and prohibitions on wasteful practices — such as watering during or right after rainfall, hosing off sidewalks and irrigating ornamental turf on public street medians — will remain in place.

Continue reading

Voters in the 34th Congressional District, which includes Boyle Heights, City Terrace, El Sereno, Lincoln Heights, Montecito Heights, Northeast L.A., southern Echo Park and other communities, will head to the polls on April 4 to cast their ballots in the primary election. Click here to find out if you live in the district and here to find your polling place and sample ballot.

Here’s a list of the candidates and election stories:

Candidates on the April 4 Ballot

  • Yolie Flores, education non-profit director and former school board member

Election Stories

More info at https://www.theeastsiderla.com/the-race-for-the-34th-congressional-district/

LA-32 Neighborhood Council Invites you to join us for:
The 7th Annual Kite Fest
Sunday, April 23, 2017
Time: 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Location: Ascot Hills Park
Address: 4371 Multnomah Street, LA, CA 90032

Family Fun, Music, Performances, FREE Activity booths, FREE KITES, goodie bags & snacks to children (while supplies last). All are welcome to bring your own kite! Come fly a kite with us!

Councilmember Jose Huizar and LA32 Neighborhood Council
will give-a-way 1,000 FREE KITES and goodie bags to children only (first come, first serve)

Thank you to our co-sponsors for partnering with us.
CD14 Councilmember Jose Huizar
Assemblymember Jimmy Gomez
Barrio Action Youth & Family Center
Farmdale Elementary
City Of L.A. Department of Recreation and Parks
LA Hillside Village Property Owner Association
El Sereno Community Coordinating Council
El Sereno Community Arts
Seishin Karate Dojo
Roxy Taxes & Immigration
Maribel Munoz, ReMax Realtor
Liz Johnson & Edith Reyna
Tender Loving Covers
CCAG Calvery Chapel here in El Sereno
Diana Velez ReMAx Realtor
Victor Paralles, Columbus Capital Lending

Great Music brought to you by:
Rick Flores from Brasas

Outstanding performances by:
Seishin Karate
Fusion Performing Dance Academy

Bring the whole family to the beautiful event. You are welcome to bring your own kite and picnic basket.

for any question please contact :
Michelle Corzantes, chair to LA32NC Arts & Cultural Committee
mcorzantes@la32nc.org
or
Julio Torres, Field Deputy of CD14 Jose Huizar
julio.torres@lacity.org

Thank you and hope to see you all on this beautiful event!

LA-32 NC Bylaws Committee met on several weekly public meetings, from June 2016 to March 2017 to amend our Bylaws. Bylaws Committee agendas were posted publicly and were in compliance with Brown Act, and BONC Policy Procedure agenda Setting, at The El Sereno Library, LA-32 NC Website, LA-32 NC Facebook, and Department of Neighborhood Empowerment Empower-LA website.
After hearing stakeholders, community members and public comments at our Bylaws Committee meetings, here are the Recommendations that Bylaws Committee has for the General Board. We have 30 days to post this so that stakeholder, community members and Board Directors have an opportunity to review and if they like to recommend any amendments to the LA-32 NC Bylaws. We will have a Special General Board Meeting once the 30 days from today has passed. We will inform our stakeholder and Board Directors of this Special General Board Meeting once we have set the date and location.

Click link here to view the amended Bylaws

LA-32 NC March 29 2017 reccomended amends of the Bylaws

The LAPD is reconsidering its policy to keep body camera footage from the public, and is asking for community input on a new policy.

The Los Angeles Board of Police Commissioners and Chief Charlie Beck outlined plans Thursday for seeking community input on establishing policies for the release of body camera footage taken during critical incidents.

Input will be gathered in community forums around Los Angeles and through a questionnaire available online or on paper.

Speaking to reporters at a new conference at the Police Administration Building downtown, Beck said the resulting policy will likely be a compromise that will please no one.

“This is a balancing act that will have an end result that will be the best servant of everybody’s needs, recognizing that probably no one will get exactly what it is they think should be the perfect policy,” Beck said.

The City Council approved a $59 million plan last June to equip Los Angeles Police Department officers with body cameras, and the department plans to issue the cameras to all patrol officers by the end of this year.  Continue reading

As the City of Los Angeles nears the end of its current fiscal year, a new report from the City Administrative Officer shows a significant decrease in the city’s budget deficit. Although the city is not out of the woods just yet, Los Angeles has narrowed it’s 2016-2017 fiscal year from $245 million to $57 million, thanks to work by the Budget and Finance Committee, an increase in revenues, and the discipline of city departments. The city’s Reserve Fund is also set to remain at levels higher than it has been in decades.

Next month, the Budget Committee reviews the Mayor’s 2017-2018 budget proposal. Once the budget is released and hearings begin, the committee will meet with all of the various city departments to hear about their needs and listen to the public’s input.

The City of LA’s Emergency Management Department encourages you to sign up to receive free emergency alerts from the NotifyLA program.

NotifyLA is a free emergency alert system that sends you life-saving safety information during emergencies and disasters. NotifyLA also keeps you up-to-date with relevant information about local emergencies and hazards like earthquakes, floods, fires and evacuations. It is the city’s best tool to send you emergency alerts and provide you with the information you need to keep yourself and your family safe.

Signing up is quick and easy!

Simply text NOTIFYLA (one word) to 888-777 right now to register your cell phone. Be sure to sign up on every cell phone in your family, and tell your friends to sign up too! You can also visit emergency.lacity.org/notifyla to register your home phone, additional cell phones and your email address.

On March 1st, the City Council voted unanimously to adopt an update to the existing Baseline Mansionization Ordinance (BMO) and Baseline Hillside Ordinance (BHO). This vote, in effect, establishes new development standards for single-family zoned properties citywide. The changes, as recommended by the City Planning Commission, incorporate additional protections to further limit large-scale homes and related construction impacts. Leading up to Council adoption of the ordinance, the Department of City Planning held public hearings with the community over the course of a six-month period to garner input. Since the adoption of the 2008 BMO and 2011 BHO, the City Council has approved several Interim Control Ordinances (ICOs) to temporarily limit the construction of over-sized homes in certain single-family neighborhoods. With the new amendment in place, the integrity and character of single-family homes citywide will be better preserved.

Some of the adopted changes to the BMO and BHO regulations include the following:

  • Establishment of new development standards for single-family zones, including the usage of angled encroachment plane and side wall articulation requirements to reduce the visual impact of building mass;
  • Modification to the definition of Residential Floor calculations to further reduce the impact of out-of-scale homes;
  • Elimination of nearly all exemptions, which created the big, boxy homes;
  • Counting of grading under a house to prevent what was previously an unlimited amount of hillside grading and
  • Reduction of Floor Area Ratio for single-family homes in R1 zones.